Relief 2.0 Photobook

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a photo book is worth a million hours of talk explaining and documenting efficient disaster response, solidarity and sustainable recovery with a focus on hope and achievements based on our field experiences in Japan, Haiti and field work in other countries.

The Relief 2.0 photo book is a testimony of the resilience of the Japanese and Haitian people and the effectiveness of disaster recovery strategies based on participation, enabling, empowerment of the disaster survivors with dignity and self-reliance through the promotion of social business and entrepreneurship.

Purchases of the Relief 2.0 Photo Book allow those interested in helping disaster areas to buy and get something back instead of making donations whose destiny is uncertain.

All profits from the series are 100% dedicated to the disaster survivors and the recovery of businesses in Japan and Haiti. A portion of the profits is reserved for printing the next edition of the books, turning the operation into a sustainable initiative.


Sections of the Photo Book

  • Disaster Strikes: documents the extent of disaster through the lens of relief worker Robin Low and the early work of Relief 2.0 in Tohoku.
  • Efficient Response: Teams of volunteers supported by mobile technologies and social networks.
    • Engagement, enabling and empowerment of local stakeholders.
    • Crowdsourcing, mobile technologies and social networks.
  • Solidarity: Collaboration and engagement of local stakeholders and international volunteers.
    • International Activities.
    • Local Initiatives.
    • TEDx Events.
  • The Way to Recovery: Sustainable recovery initiatives and resilience.
    • Social entrepreneurship and social business.
  • Back on our Feet: Successful recovery initiatives and stories.
  • Disaster Preparedness: What can and should be done to be ready before disaster strikes.

Excerpt


About Relief 2.0
About Relief 2.0

About the Photobook and its Content
About the Photobook and its Content

1. Disaster Strikes


1. Disaster Strikes
1. Disaster Strikes.
What happens when disaster strikes is an unfortunate twist of fate.

Ishinomaki, Japan | March 2011
Ishinomaki, Japan | March 2011

What happens when disaster strikes is nature's fault. What happens after is our responsibility...
What happens when disaster strikes is nature's fault.
What happens after is our responsibility...

Some cities are never going to be the same again. Some people are never going to be the same again...
Some cities are never going to be the same again.
Some people are never going to be the same again...

Disasters may destroy physical infrastructure, but the human infrastructure, the social networks, the people giving life to those networks, the people's capacity remains untouched. Disasters do not create refugees, they create survivors.
Disasters may destroy physical infrastructure, but the human infrastructure, the social networks, the people giving life to those networks, the people's capacity remains untouched.

Disasters do not create refugees, they create survivors.
It is we who turn them into refugees by putting them on refugee shelters and making them stay put and keeping them from taking care of themselves and creating their own solutions to survive.

Why do we cook for survivors and make them stand in long, annoying lines, when they can cook themselves? Why do we bring volunteers to do menial tasks, or complex ones, that the survivors can do themselves?

2. Solidarity


2. Solidarity. What happens when disaster strikes is an unfortunate twist of fate. What happens afterwards is our responsibility.
2. Solidarity.

When disaster strikes, some people are given a burden:
the burden of enduring the disaster and the conditions that follow.

Others are given a gift:
the gift of being spared from disaster.

How can we not use our gift to lift their burden?

5ive Planets
5ive Planets

Kako!!! Challenge
Kako!!! Challenge

Business Relief Initiatives
Business Relief Initiatives

Ganbappeshi
Ganbappeshi

Physical Destruction
Physical Destruction

Haïti and Japan Connected
Haïti and Japan Connected

MUCI Solidarity Kitchens in Haïti
MUCI Solidarity Kitchens in Haïti

Nes Hjelper Japan
Nes Hjelper Japan

Peace Boat responds
Peace Boat responds

TEDxPortauPrince
TEDxPortauPrince

TEDxTohoku
TEDxTohoku

The Art of Running for Ishinomaki
The Art of Running for Ishinomaki

Tohoku Dreams
Tohoku Dreams

We Have a Dream and Living Dream Orphanages
We Have a Dream and Living Dream Orphanages

Women Help Women: Japanese - Korean collaboration
Women Help Women: Japanese - Korean collaboration

3. Back on our Feet


3. Back on our Feet
3. Back on our Feet

Ecole Supérieure d'Infotronique d'Haïti (ESIH) Rebuilt
Ecole Supérieure d'Infotronique d'Haïti (ESIH) Rebuilt

Nankaen Chinese Restaurant in Ishinomaki
Nankaen Chinese Restaurant in Ishinomaki

Clean Streets
Clean Streets

Nobuyuk: Courageous orthodontist
Nobuyuk: Courageous orthodontist

4. Making the Book
4. Making the Book

Behind the Scenes: Making the Book
Behind the Scenes: Making the Book

Location of Pictures in the Book
Location of Pictures in the Book